roachpatrol:

regisfiliaaa:

Got ‘em, coach!

FUCKING SLAMMED

roachpatrol:

regisfiliaaa:

Got ‘em, coach!

FUCKING SLAMMED

(via protowilson)

rubbishtiger:

dickjarvisblogblog:

That was funny

Anybody got source/artist? TinEye shows nothing.

(anyway those last 3 panels are the best deadpan thing ever)

I once spoke to a major tv network executive (white male) who said that since his youth he understood the failings of the lack of diversity in tv, and he’d go out of his way to connect with women and people of color in the company and request that they submit tv pitches. Only a small handful of the employees he reached out to actually came to pitch. He told me he realized then that offering the opportunity to people is only half the battle.

The people he reached out to had spent their entire lives subtly being told their work was not wanted, in a way he had never personally experienced. And if you tell a certain group of people again and again that they won’t succeed, eventually they’ll stop trying.

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Polly Guo

(via d-pi)

read it and educate yourself 

Polly Guo crushing it 24/7

(via ananthymous)

(via rubbishtiger)

ladydrawers:

graphicnonfiction:

gabriellegamboa:

Check out the comic Anne Elizabeth Moore and I made for Salon on the politics of horror films!
http://www.salon.com/2013/10/29/the_truly_scary_politics_of_horror_movies/

Gender and race analysis of (mostly) American horror movies, in comic form, on Salon.

Not officially from our collective, but …

ladydrawers:

graphicnonfiction:

gabriellegamboa:

Check out the comic Anne Elizabeth Moore and I made for Salon on the politics of horror films!

http://www.salon.com/2013/10/29/the_truly_scary_politics_of_horror_movies/

Gender and race analysis of (mostly) American horror movies, in comic form, on Salon.

Not officially from our collective, but …

(via tentakrule)

mediadiversified:

It’s Time to Talk About Black Tudors

by  Rowena Mondiwa
‘A criminally neglected part of British history is the true scope of the African diaspora in Britain that reaches as far back as Renaissance Europe. A new book by Onyeka Nubia seeks to rectify the problem, examining the lives of the thousands of blacks that lived in the UK in Tudor times. In Blackamoores: Africans in Tudor England, Onyeka Nubia shares research conducted in uncovering early evidence of Black existence in the United Kingdom, and proves that black presence was evident a lot earlier than is usually assumed. Nubia’s research focuses on the Tudor era (1485- 1603), specifically looking at the four English cities of London, Plymouth, Bristol and Barnstable.
This is not the first book published about African presence in England. Black Lives in the English Archives by Imtiaz Habib (2008) and Gustav Ungerer’s The Mediterranean Apprenticeship of British Slavery (2010) are two other books that look at similar subject matter and help substantiate the information uncovered in this research project. Additionally, just this year, academic Miranda Kaufman has published essays on the same research.

mediadiversified:

It’s Time to Talk About Black Tudors

by  Rowena Mondiwa

A criminally neglected part of British history is the true scope of the African diaspora in Britain that reaches as far back as Renaissance Europe. A new book by Onyeka Nubia seeks to rectify the problem, examining the lives of the thousands of blacks that lived in the UK in Tudor times. In Blackamoores: Africans in Tudor England, Onyeka Nubia shares research conducted in uncovering early evidence of Black existence in the United Kingdom, and proves that black presence was evident a lot earlier than is usually assumed. Nubia’s research focuses on the Tudor era (1485- 1603), specifically looking at the four English cities of London, Plymouth, Bristol and Barnstable.

This is not the first book published about African presence in England. Black Lives in the English Archives by Imtiaz Habib (2008) and Gustav Ungerer’s The Mediterranean Apprenticeship of British Slavery (2010) are two other books that look at similar subject matter and help substantiate the information uncovered in this research project. Additionally, just this year, academic Miranda Kaufman has published essays on the same research.

(via mayeko)

nortonism:

Here are 10 photos (out of 22) from my series Racial Microaggressions. I have asked my friends on the Fordham University Lincoln Center campus to write down an instance of racial microaggression they have faced on a poster for me to take a picture of them. 

(via cogswithnooil)

I often explain microaggressions to people by using water as a metaphor. Marginalized folk are often subject to both unintentional and intentional forms of non-violent aggression at work, at school, on public transportation, on television, in their homes, from their family members, and from their closest friends. They’re never big moments; they’re subtle, nuanced, and often last maybe a few seconds. But imagine that every comment that someone makes about the color of a person’s skin, or relies on a stereotype, or demonizes the “ghetto,” or values white skin over brown skin, or whatever other example I could give, imagine if each comment is akin to having on ounce of water dumped on your head. The first comment is unpleasant. It may wake you up. It may make you uncomfortable. But it’s an ounce. Often times, you can just walk away from. However, in a social setting, you may hear eight different slightly unnerving things about women, about the poor, about race, about mental disability, and now someone’s poured a cup of water on your head. You can’t ignore how that feels. By the end of the day, you might have a Starbucks Venti (20 oz) dumped over you. Or a quart. Or, in a particularly hostile setting at work or a convention or somewhere in public or while watching the news, you might have a gallon poured on you. So when someone says that this shit doesn’t matter, that we need to learn to have a thicker skin, I immediately want to dump a gallon of water on their head and ask them to get a thicker skin. That’ll keep the cold out, right?

Mark Oshiro (from Mark Reads “Lady Knight”: chapter 4)

The more I read Mark’s recent reviews, the more he becomes one of my favorite Internet people. This is such a good breakdown.

(via feralphoenix)

(via cactuartamer)

stalkofwheat:

likelyhealthy:

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Race
Race is a modern idea. Ancient societies, like the Greeks, did not divide people according to physical distinctions, but according to religion, status, class, even language. The English language didn’t even have the word ‘race’ until it turns up in 1508 in a poem by William Dunbar referring to a line of kings.
Race has no genetic basis. Not one characteristic, trait or even one gene distinguishes all the members of one so-called race from all the members of another so-called race.
Human subspecies don’t exist. Unlike many animals, modern humans simply haven’t been around long enough or isolated enough to evolve into separate subspecies or races. Despite surface appearances, we are one of the most similar of all species. 
Skin color really is only skin deep. Most traits are inherited independently from one another. The genes influencing skin color have nothing to do with the genes influencing hair form, eye shape, blood type, musical talent, athletic ability or forms of intelligence. Knowing someone’s skin color doesn’t necessarily tell you anything else about him or her.
Most variation is within, not between, “races.” Of the small amount of total human variation, 85% exists within any local population, be they Italians, Kurds, Koreans or Cherokees. About 94% can be found within any continent. That means two random Koreans may be as genetically different as a Korean and an Italian.
Slavery predates race. Throughout much of human history, societies have enslaved others, often as a result of conquest or war, even debt, but not because of physical characteristics or a belief in natural inferiority. Due to a unique set of historical circumstances, ours was the first slave system where all the slaves shared similar physical characteristics.
Race and freedom evolved together. The U.S. was founded on the radical new principle that “All men are created equal.” But our early economy was based largely on slavery. How could this anomaly be rationalized? The new idea of race helped explain why some people could be denied the rights and freedoms that others took for granted.
Race justified social inequalities as natural. As the race idea evolved, white superiority became “common sense” in America. It justified not only slavery but also the extermination of Indians, exclusion of Asian immigrants, and the taking of Mexican lands by a nation that professed a belief in democracy. Racial practices were institutionalized within American government, laws, and society. 
Race isn’t biological, but racism is still real. Race is a powerful social idea that gives people different access to opportunities and resources. Our government and social institutions have created advantages that disproportionately channel wealth, power, and resources to white people. This affects everyone, whether we are aware of it or not.
Colorblindness will not end racism. Pretending race doesn’t exist is not the same as creating equality. Race is more than stereotypes and individual prejudice. To combat racism, we need to identify and remedy social policies and institutional practices that advantage some groups at the expense of others.

Super important to keep in mind in public health! I can’t count the times I’ve heard professors talk about racial differences in health status and not talk about racism or oppression.  We need to locate health indicators within our socio-political context.

I’m presuming the “ours” in #6 is referfing to the US. Well, it becomes more obvious towards the end, but until that point I was reading it generally.

stalkofwheat:

likelyhealthy:

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Race

  1. Race is a modern idea. Ancient societies, like the Greeks, did not divide people according to physical distinctions, but according to religion, status, class, even language. The English language didn’t even have the word ‘race’ until it turns up in 1508 in a poem by William Dunbar referring to a line of kings.

  2. Race has no genetic basis. Not one characteristic, trait or even one gene distinguishes all the members of one so-called race from all the members of another so-called race.

  3. Human subspecies don’t exist. Unlike many animals, modern humans simply haven’t been around long enough or isolated enough to evolve into separate subspecies or races. Despite surface appearances, we are one of the most similar of all species. 

  4. Skin color really is only skin deep. Most traits are inherited independently from one another. The genes influencing skin color have nothing to do with the genes influencing hair form, eye shape, blood type, musical talent, athletic ability or forms of intelligence. Knowing someone’s skin color doesn’t necessarily tell you anything else about him or her.

  5. Most variation is within, not between, “races.” Of the small amount of total human variation, 85% exists within any local population, be they Italians, Kurds, Koreans or Cherokees. About 94% can be found within any continent. That means two random Koreans may be as genetically different as a Korean and an Italian.

  6. Slavery predates race. Throughout much of human history, societies have enslaved others, often as a result of conquest or war, even debt, but not because of physical characteristics or a belief in natural inferiority. Due to a unique set of historical circumstances, ours was the first slave system where all the slaves shared similar physical characteristics.

  7. Race and freedom evolved together. The U.S. was founded on the radical new principle that “All men are created equal.” But our early economy was based largely on slavery. How could this anomaly be rationalized? The new idea of race helped explain why some people could be denied the rights and freedoms that others took for granted.

  8. Race justified social inequalities as natural. As the race idea evolved, white superiority became “common sense” in America. It justified not only slavery but also the extermination of Indians, exclusion of Asian immigrants, and the taking of Mexican lands by a nation that professed a belief in democracy. Racial practices were institutionalized within American government, laws, and society. 

  9. Race isn’t biological, but racism is still real. Race is a powerful social idea that gives people different access to opportunities and resources. Our government and social institutions have created advantages that disproportionately channel wealth, power, and resources to white people. This affects everyone, whether we are aware of it or not.

  10. Colorblindness will not end racism. Pretending race doesn’t exist is not the same as creating equality. Race is more than stereotypes and individual prejudice. To combat racism, we need to identify and remedy social policies and institutional practices that advantage some groups at the expense of others.

Super important to keep in mind in public health! I can’t count the times I’ve heard professors talk about racial differences in health status and not talk about racism or oppression.  We need to locate health indicators within our socio-political context.

I’m presuming the “ours” in #6 is referfing to the US. Well, it becomes more obvious towards the end, but until that point I was reading it generally.

(via koryos)

darrylayo:

[applause]

(via hobbitkaiju)

myleftsidedown:

If You Have To Tell Your Kids This Stuff, Then You Probably Aren’t A White Person (x)

(via the-full-grohac)